Northern Kentucky Soccer Academy

Commonwealth Orthopaedic Centers is proud to sponsor the Northern Kentucky Soccer Academy!  Commonwealth Orthopaedic Centers has 20 Sports Medicine Physicians and Orthopaedic Surgeons at 5 convenient Northern Kentucky locations.  Below, they provide information aimed at preventing injuries and enhancing training for NKSA athletes.  You'll find articles, and even videos on topics like "Concussions" and "Ankle Sprains."  If you have specific questions or would like to see information on a particular topic, please let us know by clicking this link to Contact Us!

Articles: 

Athlete's Corner: Hand & Wrist Injuries and Youth Sports

Rough-and-tumble contact sports like football and lacrosse include an unavoidable reality: collisions.  Those collisions sometimes lead to broken bones, some of which may occur in the hand and wrist.

There are plenty of circumstances in which a broken finger necessitates proper diagnostics and professional care.  "There are a percentage of finger injuries that require very specific treatment, and timing is important.  If it's a fresh injury, we can initiate treatment immediately, and the healing is quick, effective and complete," says Dr. Matthew T. DesJardins, a board-certified, fellowship-trained Sports Medicine specialist with experience treating all athletes, from youth athletes to weekend warriors to Olympic-level competitors.  

Wrist injuries are equally common, notes Dr. DesJardins, particularly in sports that involve falls.  As athletes attempt to brace their fall using an extended hand against the turf, the wrist takes the brunt of the impact and is damaged.  The good news is that the vast majority of these injuries can be treated with casting and, in most cases, after a brief period of healing time, the athlete can safely return to the field, even while still in a cast.

Typical Athletic Injuries - and How We Approach Treatment

Dr. James T. Bilbo is the Team Physician for Northern Kentucky University and for Newport Central Catholic High School.  Concussions, ACL tears, muscles strains - many conditions and injuries make an appearance when working with young and mature athletes.  Caring for growing adolescents presents particular challenges.

"Kids aren't as physically developed or skeletally mature," Dr. Bilbo notes.  They're prone to overuse injuries and growth-plate related injuries.  Unlike youth and high school sports programs, which tend toward too-frequent practice, notes Dr. Bilbo, college athletic programs are monitored and athletes are carefully conditioned.  Pain and injury are rapidly addressed.

"The ultimate goal is to get over the injury and minimize time away from sport.... Coaches, athletes, parents all want this," Dr. Bilbo says.  "And for patients who aren't college athletes, the skills and techniques we use in sports medicine translate into better care for all patients, whether they're athletes or not."  

Dr. Bilbo specializes in the comprehensive care of athletes.  He was inducted into the Athletic Hall of Fame at NKU, the NCC Athletic Hall of Fame, and named "Sports Medicine Person of the Year" by the Kentucky Athletic Trainers Society.  You can learn more about Dr. Bilbo here.

Athlete's Corner: Fractures and Youth Sports

Rough-and-tumble contact sports like football and lacrosse include an unavoidable reality: collisions.  Those collisions sometimes lead to broken bones.  The key is making sure fractures are managed properly, which creates optimal healing and allows the athlete to return to the game, explains matthew T. DesJardins, a board-certified, fellowship trained Sports Medicine specialist with experience treating all athletes, from weekend warriors to Olympic-level competitors.

For example, finger fractures are common in many youth sports, yet too often coaches and parents minimize these injuries and fail to seek treatment for their young athletes.  "Sometimes, when a kid breaks a finger, people think, 'Well, the doctor isn't going to do much for it anyway, probably just tape it up, so we will just take care of that at home,'" Dr. DesJardins says.  Early evaluation, he adds, can determine simple from complicated, and often allows for advice on continued play with proper protection.